Thanks for visiting! Here you'll find information about me and my books.

Other Projects
Login

Add to Technorati Favorites

Shari Becker has been telling stories for as long as she can remember. She wrote and illustrated her first children’s manuscript in third grade and hasn’t stopped since. Becker admits she’s always been a bit of a daydreamer and recalls sitting in classes throughout elementary and high school imagining fictional stories, people, and places.

Born and raised in Montreal, Quebec, Becker attended Concordia University’s well-regarded communications program. After graduation, she worked at a small film and television production company, but yearned to work in children’s T.V. So she moved to New York City in 1995 to pursue a Master of Arts in Children’s Media at New York University.

She worked at Nickelodeon as an Associate Producer after completing her degree; she wrote copy and edited the work of outside writers and developed original concepts for the Web. It quickly became clear that Becker’s greatest strengths lay in her creative brainstorming and writing abilities. After her work caught the eye of a Nickelodeon executive, he invited her to join Nick’s Creative Lab, a “think tank” charged with developing innovative content bridging online and on-air worlds.

Since then Becker has remained dedicated to kids and quality children’s media. She has consulted for Shadow Projects, the production company behind Disney’s Emmy-award-winning Bear in the Big Blue House and Book of Pooh, and she has written for Nickelodeon, BabyZone.com and TimeforKids.com and publications such as Baby Years and Parents and Kids.

Becker moved to Brookline, Massachusetts in 2001, where she now resides with her husband, John, and their daughters, Emelia and Helaina.

Becker recently finished her first young adult novel, and is working on a second novel as well as a picture book.

“I find inspiration everywhere,” she says. “In my memories, in the news, and in the antics of my fun-loving husband and daughters. They keep me laughing … and writing.”